The Paris Agreement Aims

The Paris Agreement establishes a global framework to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to well below 2°C and making efforts to limit it to 1.5°C. It also aims to strengthen the capacity of countries to cope with the effects of climate change and to support them in their efforts. The quality of each country on track to meet its obligations under the Paris Agreement can be continuously monitored online (via the Climate Action Tracker[95] and the Climate Clock). In fact, research clearly shows that the cost of climate inaction far outweighs the cost of reducing carbon pollution. A recent study suggests that if the U.S. fails to meet its Paris climate goals, it could cost the economy up to $6 trillion in the coming decades. A global failure to comply with the DND currently set out in the agreement could reduce global GDP by more than 25% by the end of the century. Meanwhile, another study estimates that achieving – or even exceeding – that the Paris targets could be very beneficial on a global scale by investing in infrastructure in clean energy and energy efficiency, to the amount of about $19 trillion. NRDC is working to make the Global Climate Action Summit a success by inspiring more ambitious commitments for the historic 2015 agreement and strengthened initiatives to reduce pollution. The Paris Agreement, already described as a historic agreement after its adoption, owes its success not only to the return of a favourable context for climate change and sustainable development, but also to efforts to reshape the management of international climate negotiations. The Paris Agreement is supported by new initiatives, which are all adaptations to the difficulties identified by previous P.C.A.

This innovative approach is based on four elements: the adoption of a universal agreement. Define the national contributions of each State to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. While the text of the agreement does not mention the content of these contributions, it obliges the signatory states to draw up a contribution plan, to implement it and to increase the amounts every five years. . . .